Google websites without https as not secure? Here is why

This is a new developement Google is set to mark your favourite websites as not secure (websites not having https) Here is why.

Search engine giant, Google, on Friday announced that it will soon mark all HTTP sites as non-secure. The information was shared by Chrome security product manager Emily Schechter in a blog post for the company.

This is a new developement Google is set to mark your favourite websites as not secure (websites not having https) Here is why.
Search engine giant, Google, on Friday announced that it will soon mark all HTTP sites as non-secure. The information was shared by Chrome security product manager Emily Schechter in a blog post for the company.

Search engine giant, Google, on Friday said that it will soon mark all HTTP sites as non-secure. The information was shared by Chrome security product manager Emily Schechter in a blog post for the company. The move is aimed at encouraging websites to adopt HTTPS encryption. The Hyper Text Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS) is the secure version of HTTP, a protocol over which data is sent between the user’s browser and the website that they are connected to. As per the blog post, the ‘not secure’ tag for the HTTP websites will start rolling out from July 2018, the same month when Chrome 68 is expected to make its debut.

HTTPS (HTTP Secure) is an adaptation of the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) for secure communication over a computer network, and is widely used on the Internet.[1][2] In HTTPS, the communication protocol is encrypted by Transport Layer Security (TLS), or formerly, its predecessor, Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). The protocol is therefore also often referred to as HTTP over TLS,[3] or HTTP over SSL.
The principal motivation for HTTPS is authentication of the accessed website and protection of the privacy and integrity of the exchanged data. It protects against man-in-the-middle attacks. The bidirectional encryption of communications between a client and server protects against eavesdropping and tampering of the communication.[5] In practice, this provides a reasonable assurance that one is communicating without interference by attackers with the website that one intended to communicate with, as opposed to an impostor.
Historically, HTTPS connections were primarily used for payment transactions on the World Wide Web, e-mail and for sensitive transactions in corporate information systems.[citation needed] In the late 2000s and early 2010s, HTTPS was increasingly used for protecting page authenticity on all types of websites, securing accounts and keeping user communications, identity and web browsing private.
The company believes that the transition from HTTP to HTTPS has helped protect over 68 per cent of Chrome traffic on Android and Windows last year. The search giant revealed that over 78 per cent of Chrome traffic is now protected on Chrome OS and Mac. “Chrome is dedicated to making it as easy as possible to set up HTTPS. Mixed content audits are now available to help developers migrate their sites to HTTPS in the latest Node CLI version of Lighthouse, an automated tool for improving web pages,” the Google blog post read.

Lighthouse supports a new audit that helps developers find which resources a site loads using HTTP. It also makes it easy to identify those which can be upgraded to HTTPS simply by changing the subresource reference to the HTTPS version.

“For the past several years, we’ve moved toward a more secure web by strongly advocating that sites adopt HTTPS encryption. And within the last year, we’ve also helped users understand that HTTP sites are not secure by gradually marking a larger subset of HTTP pages as not secure. Beginning in July 2018 with the release of Chrome 68, Chrome will mark all HTTP sites as not secure,” the post added.

The Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) scheme HTTPS has identical usage syntax to the HTTP scheme. However, HTTPS signals the browser to use an added encryption layer of SSL/TLS to protect the traffic. SSL/TLS is especially suited for HTTP, since it can provide some protection even if only one side of the communication is authenticated. This is the case with HTTP transactions over the Internet, where typically only the server is authenticated (by the client examining the server’s certificate).

HTTPS creates a secure channel over an insecure network. This ensures reasonable protection from eavesdroppers and man-in-the-middle attacks, provided that adequate cipher suites are used and that the server certificate is verified and trusted.

Because HTTPS piggybacks HTTP entirely on top of TLS, the entirety of the underlying HTTP protocol can be encrypted. This includes the request URL (which particular web page was requested), query parameters, headers, and cookies (which often contain identity information about the user). However, because host (website) addresses and port numbers are necessarily part of the underlying TCP/IP protocols, HTTPS cannot protect their disclosure.

In practice this means that even on a correctly configured web server, eavesdroppers can infer the IP address and port number of the web server (sometimes even the domain name e.g. www.example.org, but not the rest of the URL) that one is communicating with, as well as the amount (data transferred) and duration (length of session) of the communication, though not the content of the communication.

Google said that 81 out of top 100 sites on the web use HTTPS by default. The company had announced that it will mark all HTTP pages as non-secure in December 2016 for the first time. The feature was unveiled for Chrome version 56, which marks HTTP pages that collect passwords or credit cards as non-secure.
Web browsers know how to trust HTTPS websites based on certificate authorities that come pre-installed in their software. Certificate authorities (such as Symantec, Comodo, GoDaddy, GlobalSign and Let’s Encrypt) are in this way being trusted by web browser creators to provide valid certificates. Therefore, a user should trust an HTTPS connection to a website if and only if all of the following are true.

HTTPS is especially important over insecure networks (such as public Wi-Fi access points), as anyone on the same local network can packet-sniff and discover sensitive information not protected by HTTPS. Additionally, many free to use and paid WLAN networks engage in packet injection in order to serve their own ads on webpages. However, this can be exploited maliciously in many ways, such as injecting malware onto webpages and stealing users’ private information.
HTTPS is also very important for connections over the Tor anonymity network, as malicious Tor nodes can damage or alter the contents passing through them in an insecure fashion and inject malware into the connection.

This is one reason why the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the Tor project started the development of HTTPS Everywhere, which is included in the Tor Browser Bundle. So if you are yet to upgrade your website to https you should do that immediately because it a an important ranking factor.
Search engine giant, Google, on Friday said that it will soon mark all HTTP sites as non-secure. The information was shared by Chrome security product manager Emily Schechter in a blog post for the company. The move is aimed at encouraging websites to adopt HTTPS encryption.

The Hyper Text Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS) is the secure version of HTTP, a protocol over which data is sent between the user’s browser and the website that they are connected to. As per the blog post, the ‘not secure’ tag for the HTTP websites will start rolling out from July 2018, the same month when Chrome 68 is expected to make its debut.

HTTPS (HTTP Secure) is an adaptation of the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) for secure communication over a computer network, and is widely used on the Internet.[1][2] In HTTPS, the communication protocol is encrypted by Transport Layer Security (TLS), or formerly, its predecessor, Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). The protocol is therefore also often referred to as HTTP over TLS,[3] or HTTP over SSL.

The principal motivation for HTTPS is authentication of the accessed website and protection of the privacy and integrity of the exchanged data. It protects against man-in-the-middle attacks. The bidirectional encryption of communications between a client and server protects against eavesdropping and tampering of the communication. In practice, this provides a reasonable assurance that one is communicating without interference by attackers with the website that one intended to communicate with, as opposed to an impostor.

Historically, HTTPS connections were primarily used for payment transactions on the World Wide Web, e-mail and for sensitive transactions in corporate information systems.[citation needed] In the late 2000s and early 2010s, HTTPS was increasingly used for protecting page authenticity on all types of websites, securing accounts and keeping user communications, identity and web browsing private.

The company believes that the transition from HTTP to HTTPS has helped protect over 68 per cent of Chrome traffic on Android and Windows last year. The search giant revealed that over 78 per cent of Chrome traffic is now protected on Chrome OS and Mac. “Chrome is dedicated to making it as easy as possible to set up HTTPS. Mixed content audits are now available to help developers migrate their sites to HTTPS in the latest Node CLI version of Lighthouse, an automated tool for improving web pages,” the Google blog post read.

Lighthouse supports a new audit that helps developers find which resources a site loads using HTTP. It also makes it easy to identify those which can be upgraded to HTTPS simply by changing the subresource reference to the HTTPS version.

“For the past several years, we’ve moved toward a more secure web by strongly advocating that sites adopt HTTPS encryption. And within the last year, we’ve also helped users understand that HTTP sites are not secure by gradually marking a larger subset of HTTP pages as not secure. Beginning in July 2018 with the release of Chrome 68, Chrome will mark all HTTP sites as not secure,” the post added.

The Uniform Resource Identifier (URI) scheme HTTPS has identical usage syntax to the HTTP scheme. However, HTTPS signals the browser to use an added encryption layer of SSL/TLS to protect the traffic. SSL/TLS is especially suited for HTTP, since it can provide some protection even if only one side of the communication is authenticated. This is the case with HTTP transactions over the Internet, where typically only the server is authenticated (by the client examining the server’s certificate).

HTTPS creates a secure channel over an insecure network. This ensures reasonable protection from eavesdroppers and man-in-the-middle attacks, provided that adequate cipher suites are used and that the server certificate is verified and trusted.

Because HTTPS piggybacks HTTP entirely on top of TLS, the entirety of the underlying HTTP protocol can be encrypted. This includes the request URL (which particular web page was requested), query parameters, headers, and cookies (which often contain identity information about the user). However, because host (website) addresses and port numbers are necessarily part of the underlying TCP/IP protocols, HTTPS cannot protect their disclosure.

In practice this means that even on a correctly configured web server, eavesdroppers can infer the IP address and port number of the web server (sometimes even the domain name e.g. www.example.org, but not the rest of the URL) that one is communicating with, as well as the amount (data transferred) and duration (length of session) of the communication, though not the content of the communication.

Google said that 81 out of top 100 sites on the web use HTTPS by default. The company had announced that it will mark all HTTP pages as non-secure in December 2016 for the first time. The feature was unveiled for Chrome version 56, which marks HTTP pages that collect passwords or credit cards as non-secure.

Web browsers know how to trust HTTPS websites based on certificate authorities that come pre-installed in their software. Certificate authorities (such as Symantec, Comodo, GoDaddy, GlobalSign and Let’s Encrypt) are in this way being trusted by web browser creators to provide valid certificates. Therefore, a user should trust an HTTPS connection to a website if and only if all of the following are true.

HTTPS is especially important over insecure networks (such as public Wi-Fi access points), as anyone on the same local network can packet-sniff and discover sensitive information not protected by HTTPS. Additionally, many free to use and paid WLAN networks engage in packet injection in order to serve their own ads on webpages. However, this can be exploited maliciously in many ways, such as injecting malware onto webpages and stealing users’ private information.

HTTPS is also very important for connections over the Tor anonymity network, as malicious Tor nodes can damage or alter the contents passing through them in an insecure fashion and inject malware into the connection. This is one reason why the Electronic Frontier Foundation and the Tor project started the development of HTTPS Everywhere, which is included in the Tor Browser Bundle. So if you are yet to upgrade your website to https you should do that immediately because it a an important seo and ranking factor.

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